gototopgototop
Tel: 07 3394 4108


Frequently Asked Questions

Click on a FAQ item to read more



Why do I have to take the pill?
Many cycles of IVF treatment (or even frozen embryo transfers when you take hormones) require you to take the contraceptive pill for a short while before the treatment cycle.  Generally only “active” pills are taken (not sugar ones) and the duration on the pill is less than 3 weeks.  Sometimes during the time you are taking the pill  you will commence treatment with either Synarel or Lucrin .  Taking the pill whilst Synarel or Lucrin is introduced reduces the risk of cysts developing on the ovaries.  The pill prevents follicles which contain eggs growing on your ovaries which means that when you start the injections of FSH the ovary is maximally receptive to the effect of FSH.Another reason you should take the pill in your monthly cycle before the egg-collection cycle, is to allow more accurate planning of the day of your egg collection. You will have been given a treatment planner and on that planner the time you take the pill is variable because the date your period begins is often a little bit unpredictable.

[back to FAQ list]

 
Do I have to keep taking the Synarel or Lucrin when the other medication starts?
Yes, it is very important that you do not stop the Lucrin or Synarel at this time. Synarel or Lucrin  should be taken until the day the last FSH injection is given before egg collection. If you stop Lucrin or Synarel treatment before that time you may ovulate and lose your eggs before they can be collected.

[back to FAQ list]

 
What's my blood group?
Your blood group is generally ascertained before you start any form of fertility treatment. It may be important to know your blood group if you have a miscarriage. If you become pregnant and have the Rh-negative blood group type you will be given an injection of gamma globulin during pregnancy, after any bleeding and after delivery to help prevent you developing Rh antibodies.   Once you have developed Rh antibodies these antibodies may cause a problem in any future pregnancy and will be present in your blood for ever.  It is therefore most important that women of the Rh negative blood type are aware of the implications of Rh negative status.  Ask your doctor or nurse for further information.

[back to FAQ list]

 
Why are we NOT covered by Medicare completely?
The Medicare funding available for assisted reproduction treatment in Australia is more generous than any other country throughout the world. However it is still insufficient to cover the cost of all aspects of your treatment.

[back to FAQ list]

 
Why is the treatment not covered fully by private medical insurance?
Private medical insurance only pays for treatment done on patients admitted to hospital and classed as an “inpatient”. As the egg collection and embryo transfer require hospital admission they are covered by many of the private health funds.  You may need to check that your health fund covers fertility treatment.

[back to FAQ list]

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 4
Suite 9A, Administration Building
Greenslopes Private Hospital
Newdegate Street Greenslopes QLD 4120